Wednesday, 15 January 2020

Humanity's Need

These twelve Jesus sent out, instructing them as follows: "Do not make your way to gentile territory, and do not enter any Samaritan town; go instead to the lost sheep of the House of Israel." (Matthew 10:6)

For a man who spent much of his time in the company of those on the fringes of society, or with the underclass such as tax gatherers and prostitutes, as well as with people in various states of immorality, the statement in Matt. 10:6 appears to be a somewhat heartless, unkind injunction to 'the twelve.'
          In my earlier post, "Still Scratching the Surface of Christianity" I quoted a comment by Bart D. Ehrman, the author of, "Lost Scriptures" in which he points out certain emphases in contrast such as those who can understand and those who cannot; between knowledge that is exoteric (available to all) and that which is esoteric (available only to insiders); between the immature outsiders (regular Christians, symbolically called "Hebrews") and the mature insiders (Gnostics, symbolically called "Gentiles").
          If one now applies that comment to the text quoted above, a meaning can emerge which is more in tune with what we read of Jesus' character. There would be little if any point in preaching the 'good news' or gnosis to the gentiles as they were already in possession of gnosis. Similarly, why waste time in Samaritan towns where gnosis (albeit mixed with a degree of error) was already present? They had already been awakened. It was the 'lost sheep' of the House of Israel, the unenlightened, literalist Hebrews, who needed to become enlightened to the true meaning of scripture, to refrain from 'taking things as read.'
          It was then, and still is now, important to change our way of thinking, or repent as both Jesus the Christ and John the Baptist often said. The principle of repentance and the acquisition of gnosis applies just as much in other fields, such as science, psychology, politics  as it does in more religious and psychospiritual areas of endeavour. The time is here when we must search beyond the forms of the realist universe around us, to gain fresh understanding, wisdom, and gnosis, if we are to meet the needs of humanity. Whether the news out there is good or bad, we need to listen and to hear.

10 comments:

  1. Hi Tom,
    Yes, I am inclined to think we might observe 3 things: who sent out the 12, what precisely were they to teach and what were they to do? Rather obviously Jesus sent them, secondly to teach them of that which was yet to be realised as the resurrected Messiah? Finally, what they were to do was to prepare the way for the Jewish nation, as turmoil and trepidation was sure to follow the ushering in of the new way of thinking, to embody one wine and one spirt for all. I think there are different time frames in the respective narratives in the gospel. The time of that text and its message was at variance to later texts conveyed to the Gentiles.
    But I agree the original message to the House of Israel, to the 12 tribes, to listen to the 12 sent by Jesus, is rich in symbolism and application to suggest a new way of thinking.
    Best wishes

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Lindsay,
      I would suggest, taking the metaphysical approach I am using here, that it is the Higher Self that seeks to enlighten the ego, or lower self, about the possibility of spiritual recovery. The way to recovery is through repentance, thinking in a new way which leads to the eradication of denial as a starter. The rest is up to God, however one chooses (or not choose) to understand that word.

      Delete
  2. Hi Tom,
    Just as an aside have you read any of the books by Paul Davies such as ‘The Fifth Miracle’; concerning the origins of life?
    Best wishes

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hello Lindsay,
      No, I haven't read any of Paul Davies' books. What is it about 'The Fifth Miracle' that brings it to my notice? I ask because I am in the process of severely prioritising my activities. I rather regret to say that one of the first activities to sink to the bottom of my list is blogging.

      I suppose like many others I should say, "That's it, but not for ever." But frankly, I see no point in carrying on any further with Gwynt. You have been a loyal supporter of mine for a long time, and I would like to thank for that.

      Delete
    2. I am sad to read this comment. Reading Gwynt has always taken me into a better place, sometimes a challenging place, but always better.
      Thank you both for being part of my life, from afar.

      Delete
  3. Hi Tom,
    The book probably isn’t one to place on your ‘to read list’
    Paul Davies is physicist and science writer and this an earlier edition that talks about the origin and meaning of life, notwithstanding the second law of thermodynamics. I have mixed feelings on it and thought you might have read it and have an opinion.
    Davies has written extensively about life's complexity; mind, soul, lack of freewill and the problems inherent in defining "miracle"; the mystery of time; whether or not this universe is a chance creation or part of a bigger plan, so miraculously tuned to produce life from opposing and uniting forces. But only as far as it is known.
    Best wishes for the future.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Deanna and Lindsay,

      Thank you very much for your comments.

      Delete
    2. I have decided to keep GWYNT open, as well as the comment box for this post as a point of contact. If anyone chooses to comment or just chat, I will respond. Not to do so would seem to be..... discourteous.

      Delete
    3. re my previous comment, my e-mail address is:-

      thomaskmptn-at-gmail-dot-com

      Delete
  4. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

    ReplyDelete